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Stamp duty calculator

Stamp Duty Land Tax is a tax paid to the Government when land or property is bought or transferred in the UK. In Scotland, the equivalent is called Land and Buildings Transaction Tax and in Wales, Land Transaction Tax. Stamp duty is not due on caravans, mobile homes or houseboats. 

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Stamp Duty Calculator

Note

This calculator is intended to give an indication only and applies to England and Northern Ireland only. First-time buyers who are purchasing a buy-to-let property still pay stamp duty at the additional property rate and not the first-time buyer rate. Updated as at 23 September 2022. 

 

Stamp duty explained

How much stamp duty do I have to pay?

How much stamp duty you pay is dependent on several factors, including:

  • The purchase price of the property
  • Whether you are a first-time buyer
  • Whether you own a single property or multiple properties

Stamp duty bands for England and Northern Ireland:

Not a first-time buyer, the property is not a second home and not a buy-to-let

Min property purchase price

Max property purchase price

Stamp duty rate (applies only to the part of the property price falling within that band)

£0

£250,000

0%

£250,001

£925,000

5%

£925,001

£1,500,000

10%

£1,500,000+

-

12%

Not a first-time buyer, but property IS a second home and/or IS a buy-to-let

Min property purchase price

Max property purchase price

Stamp duty rate (applies only to the part of the property price falling within that band)

£0

£250,000

3%

£250,001

£925,000

8%

£925,001

£1,500,000

13%

£1,500,000+

-

15%

Applies to purchases of £40,000 or over.

First-time buyer stamp duty rates for purchases up to £625,000 (and shared ownership mortgages)

Min property purchase price

Max property purchase price

Stamp duty rate (applies only to the part of the property price falling within that band)

£0

£425,000

0%

£425,001

£625,000

5%

£625,001+

-

N/A – Stamp duty is calculated as if you weren’t a first-time buyer as per the tables above

Scotland – Land and Buildings Transaction Tax (LBTT) – First Time Buyer:

Min property purchase price

Max property purchase price

LBTT rate (applies only to the part of the property price falling within that band)

£0

£175,000

0%

£175,001

£250,000

2%

£250,001

£325,000

5%

£325,001

£750,000

10%

£750,001+

-

12%

Scotland – Land and Buildings Transaction Tax (LBTT) – Home Mover:

Min property purchase price

Max property purchase price

LBTT rate (applies only to the part of the property price falling within that band)

£0

£145,000

0%

£145,001

£250,000

2%

£250,001

£325,000

5%

£325,001

£750,000

10%

£750,001+

-

12%

Scotland – Land and Buildings Transaction Tax (LBTT) – Additional Dwelling Supplement:

Min property purchase price

Max property purchase price

LBTT rate (applies only to the part of the property price falling within that band)

£0

£40,000

0%

£40,001

£145,000

4% (paid from £1)

£145,001

£250,000

6%

£250,001

£325,000

9%

£750,001+

-

16%

Wales – Land Transaction Tax (LTT) for freehold residential transactions – First Time Buyer:

Min property purchase price

Max property purchase price

LTT rate (applies only to the part of the property price falling within that band)

£0

£180,000

0%

£180,001

£250,000

3.5%

£250,001

£400,000

5%

£400,001

£750,000

7.5%

£750,001

£1,500,000

10%

£1,500,000+

-

12%

Wales – Land Transaction Tax (LTT) for non-residential transactions:

Min property purchase price

Max property purchase price

LTT rate (applies only to the part of the property price falling within that band)

£0

£225,000

0%

£225,001

£250,000

1%

£250,000

£1,000,000

5%

£1,000,001+

-

6%

Wales – Land Transaction Tax (LTT) for second homes or buy-to-let transactions:

Min property purchase price

Max property purchase price

LTT duty rate (applies only to the part of the property price falling within that band)

£0

£180,000

4%

£180,001

£250,000

7.5%

£250,001

£400,000

9%

£400,001

£750,000

11.5%

£750,001

£1,500,000

14%

£1,500,001+

-

16%

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At what price does stamp duty start?

Stamp duty must be paid on residential properties and land bought with a value in excess of £250,000. First-time buyers have a discount that means they do not pay any stamp duty on properties up to £425,000. First-time buyers that purchase a property between £425,001 and £625,000 must pay 5% on the excess over £425,000.

For additional homes or BTL properties in excess of the threshold the buyer will have to pay an additional 3% stamp duty compared to the standard rate.

 

Some examples of how to calculate stamp duty

These examples are for stamp duty rates.

You purchase a property at £350,000.

You are allowed £250,000 with no stamp duty tax to pay.

You then calculate 5% of £100,000

Stamp duty to pay is £5,000

 

You purchase a house at £500,000.

You are allowed £250,000 with no stamp duty tax to pay.

You then calculate 5% of £250,000 .

The amount of stamp duty to pay is £12,500.

What is the difference between stamp duty and stamp duty land tax?

Stamp duty land tax (SDLT) is the full name for stamp duty in England and Northern Ireland and indicates that this tax is payable on the purchase of property and land in those countries.

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Stamp duty FAQs

Is stamp duty rounded up or down?

When calculating stamp duty, this is rounded down to the nearest full pound.

How quickly do you have to pay stamp duty?

Stamp duty needs to be paid within 14 days of the effective transaction date. Often this is the completion date, but it may also be the earliest date the new owner can take passion of the property or where a substantial completion (at least 90% of the money owed is paid for the property).

Can stamp duty be added to a mortgage?

A mortgage is the money lent to you by a mortgage lender to purchase the land or property. Stamp duty is a tax payable to HMRC. You can choose to add the cost of your stamp duty to your mortgage; however, this is at the lender’s discretion and it will incur interest costs over the life of the mortgage.

Are there reasons not to pay stamp duty?

All land and property under £250,000 (£40,000 for a second home or buy-to-let property) is exempt from stamp duty, however with average house prices well in excess of this figure, most house buyers will not find this possible. Scenarios where stamp duty does not apply include if a property is being transferred due to divorce or separation or as part of your will.

When might you have to pay a higher rate of stamp duty?

If you purchase a new property and then have a delay in selling your existing home, you will be classed as a second-home owner and will need to pay the higher rate of stamp duty of an additional 3% on each stamp duty band. If you sell or transfer your previous home within three years, then you may be able to claim a refund of the higher rate stamp duty.

Can stamp duty be refunded?

You can get a refund of stamp duty at the higher rate if you sell or transfer your former main residence within three years of purchasing your new home. You will need to claim the refund within three months of selling your former main home or within 12 months of filing your stamp duty tax return, whichever date is latest applies.

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